I forgot to submit my name with the last photo, but I’m Liz Jang from Brooklyn, NY! My e-mail address is thisizliz@gmail.com.

I forgot to submit my name with the last photo, but I’m Liz Jang from Brooklyn, NY! My e-mail address is thisizliz@gmail.com.

migrantography:

Amy Lin’s testimony in New America Media:

I came to the United States when I was 12 years old. My mother and I had not only hoped for a better life, but also to escape from an exploitative relationship with my father. We left everything and everyone behind to find freedom. Life wasn’t easy when we got here, but I was sure that as long as we are away from my father, we would live a proper life and I could be myself.  All that was shattered when my mom told me, just as I was looking into applying to college, that we were undocumented. I felt helpless and defeated. But I wasn’t angry at anyone, especially not my mom, for what she had decided to do in order for us to survive. I was just scared.  I had already told my mom about my sexual orientation and was very aware of the discrimination encountered by people who are queer. Being both undocumented and queer meant I felt locked out of two different worlds.  With my new identities, I quickly learned to choose between coming out as queer or as undocumented because bearing just one identity was easier than being punished as both.

migrantography:

Amy Lin’s testimony in New America Media:

I came to the United States when I was 12 years old. My mother and I had not only hoped for a better life, but also to escape from an exploitative relationship with my father. We left everything and everyone behind to find freedom. Life wasn’t easy when we got here, but I was sure that as long as we are away from my father, we would live a proper life and I could be myself.

All that was shattered when my mom told me, just as I was looking into applying to college, that we were undocumented. I felt helpless and defeated. But I wasn’t angry at anyone, especially not my mom, for what she had decided to do in order for us to survive. I was just scared.

I had already told my mom about my sexual orientation and was very aware of the discrimination encountered by people who are queer. Being both undocumented and queer meant I felt locked out of two different worlds.

With my new identities, I quickly learned to choose between coming out as queer or as undocumented because bearing just one identity was easier than being punished as both.

(via asamstudiesintro)

Mi familia y yo celebrando las pausqua 

Mi familia y yo celebrando las pausqua 

Family means creating a path for future generations. 
Je Yon Jung, Washington D.C. 

Family means creating a path for future generations. 

Je Yon Jung, Washington D.C. 

We love our son, Sahn! 
Hyeyoung Lee — Chicago, IL
I came to the U.S. 10 years ago as an international student. I met my husband at the school where I studied. We got married in 2009 and had our new addition on March 7th, 2013. This photo was taken last week at the retreat center, Rochester, IN. Our son’s name is Sahn which means mountain in Korean. Many Asian people mentioned that Sahn looks like American (whatever that means), and many of my American friends said that he looks like an Asian baby. I think my son has to deal with this in his life being questioned by many people where he belongs to. Raising a bi-cultural/racial child will be an interesting for us as we also have to face this kind of questions. Someday we will have conversation with Sahn what it means to be both Korean and American. 

We love our son, Sahn! 

Hyeyoung Lee — Chicago, IL

I came to the U.S. 10 years ago as an international student. I met my husband at the school where I studied. We got married in 2009 and had our new addition on March 7th, 2013. This photo was taken last week at the retreat center, Rochester, IN. Our son’s name is Sahn which means mountain in Korean. Many Asian people mentioned that Sahn looks like American (whatever that means), and many of my American friends said that he looks like an Asian baby. I think my son has to deal with this in his life being questioned by many people where he belongs to. Raising a bi-cultural/racial child will be an interesting for us as we also have to face this kind of questions. Someday we will have conversation with Sahn what it means to be both Korean and American. 

My Family is Important 
Diana Hong 
 My family is my single most important thing in my life because I know that I can always rely on them, and also they’ll always be there for me no matter what happens. My life would be meaningless without my family because we love, care and support each other. I always put my family first, and they just do the same.

My Family is Important 

Diana Hong 

 My family is my single most important thing in my life because I know that I can always rely on them, and also they’ll always be there for me no matter what happens. My life would be meaningless without my family because we love, care and support each other. I always put my family first, and they just do the same.


Strength, Love, and Sacrifice: My Refugee Family 
Tam Duong — Los Angeles, CA 
This picture was taken during the Lunar New Year. My parents did not have much growing up but they always made sure my brother and I had new clothes and shoes to wear during the new year for good luck.
My parents came to the U.S. as refugees after the Viet Nam war. I grew up in California, a place with a large number of Asian immigrants now, but I remember learning about a time when Govenor Jerry Brown tried to block Vietnamese refugees from entering because California had high unemployment. Brown thought there were “too many Hispanics, too many people on welfare.” My family was displaced from their native land because of war and instead of acceptance there was the same anti-immigrant rhetoric going on then as now. History repeats, which is why I stand in solidarity with the 11 million undocumented immigrants who came to this country for better opportunities. We need comprehensive immigration reform for all!

Strength, Love, and Sacrifice: My Refugee Family 

Tam Duong — Los Angeles, CA 

This picture was taken during the Lunar New Year. My parents did not have much growing up but they always made sure my brother and I had new clothes and shoes to wear during the new year for good luck.

My parents came to the U.S. as refugees after the Viet Nam war. I grew up in California, a place with a large number of Asian immigrants now, but I remember learning about a time when Govenor Jerry Brown tried to block Vietnamese refugees from entering because California had high unemployment. Brown thought there were “too many Hispanics, too many people on welfare.” My family was displaced from their native land because of war and instead of acceptance there was the same anti-immigrant rhetoric going on then as now. History repeats, which is why I stand in solidarity with the 11 million undocumented immigrants who came to this country for better opportunities. 

We need comprehensive immigration reform for all!

Immigration is about my Family 
Dae Joong Yoon - Los Angeles, CA 
My mom was born in North Korea. When she was twelve, she, her mom (my grandmother), older sister, and two younger brothers walked for days from the North to South Korea. They left her father behind with the expectation that he would rejoin within weeks.  Instead, the Korean War broke out. Since that time, till today, for over 60 years, she has had no communication with her father. She does not even know if the father is still alive or passed away, and if he died, how or when.  Whenever there is a family gather, we start with a prayer and my mother starts to cry. As soon as she utters the words; “Our father,” I know she is referring to God but am aware that she has been wanted to call out to her own beloved father. We immigrated to the U.S. in order to be reunited with my grandmother, aunts and uncles. My mother’s brother sponsored my mom.  My mom chose to come because keeping the family together meant everything for her. Yet, it was not an easy choice. To come, she also had to leave behind her oldest son, my brother, because he was 22 years of age and there were limited visas for adult children. I can remember the day we said goodbye to my brother at the airport. My mother cried the entire ride on the plane. We arrived in America in 1988. Until my brother was able to join us 5 years later, whenever we gathered to eat, my mother would say “Oh Father” and “Please take care of our Hak Joong.” And then my mother wept. Korean Americans have endured painful separations because of the Korean War. America must have an immigration system that unites families.  Immigration is about family. 
**Please note:  This photo was submitted by a NAKASEC, KRCC, kRC staff member and is meant to serve as a sample for the “We Are America, America is Home” photo contest. This will not be part of the final batch of photos that will be considered in the actual contest and is not eligible to be voted on for prizes. **

Immigration is about my Family 

Dae Joong Yoon - Los Angeles, CA 

My mom was born in North Korea. When she was twelve, she, her mom (my grandmother), older sister, and two younger brothers walked for days from the North to South Korea. They left her father behind with the expectation that he would rejoin within weeks.  Instead, the Korean War broke out. Since that time, till today, for over 60 years, she has had no communication with her father. She does not even know if the father is still alive or passed away, and if he died, how or when.  Whenever there is a family gather, we start with a prayer and my mother starts to cry. As soon as she utters the words; “Our father,” I know she is referring to God but am aware that she has been wanted to call out to her own beloved father. We immigrated to the U.S. in order to be reunited with my grandmother, aunts and uncles. My mother’s brother sponsored my mom.  My mom chose to come because keeping the family together meant everything for her. Yet, it was not an easy choice. To come, she also had to leave behind her oldest son, my brother, because he was 22 years of age and there were limited visas for adult children. I can remember the day we said goodbye to my brother at the airport. My mother cried the entire ride on the plane. We arrived in America in 1988. Until my brother was able to join us 5 years later, whenever we gathered to eat, my mother would say “Oh Father” and “Please take care of our Hak Joong.” And then my mother wept. Korean Americans have endured painful separations because of the Korean War. America must have an immigration system that unites families.  Immigration is about family. 

**Please note:  This photo was submitted by a NAKASEC, KRCC, kRC staff member and is meant to serve as a sample for the “We Are America, America is Home” photo contest. This will not be part of the final batch of photos that will be considered in the actual contest and is not eligible to be voted on for prizes. **

Last Picture of my Family Together 
Sagar Patagundi Louisville, KY
THIS IS AS FAR BACK AS I CAN REMEMBER THE LAST PICTURE OF MY FAMILY TOGETHER THAT I HAVE SEEN. WANT TO KNOW WHY??
I was looking for a picture of my family. I came to realize that I don’t have any pictures of my family together since I was at age 3-4. These past 21 years of my life there has someone always that’s been missing out of my life because of immigration issues.
Click her for the rest of the story! http://bit.ly/15YKSrv
Sagar Patagundi Louisville, KY

Last Picture of my Family Together 

Sagar Patagundi Louisville, KY

THIS IS AS FAR BACK AS I CAN REMEMBER THE LAST PICTURE OF MY FAMILY TOGETHER THAT I HAVE SEEN. WANT TO KNOW WHY??

I was looking for a picture of my family. I came to realize that I don’t have any pictures of my family together since I was at age 3-4. These past 21 years of my life there has someone always that’s been missing out of my life because of immigration issues.

Click her for the rest of the story! http://bit.ly/15YKSrv

Sagar Patagundi Louisville, KY

We are a Family of Women 
Alexis Ruiz — Acworth, GA 
My mother raised my two sisters and I on her own. After overstaying her student visa, she became undocumented and we all felt the repercussions. My mother’s job options were very limited, but our struggles forged our bond and helped us become stronger, more independent women. 
Today, we continue communicating each other’s joys, sorrows, and laughter. I am grateful for the sacrifice mom made to offer my sister’s and me the world. There’s a lot of misinformation out there that hides the reality that people come to the US to work hard and give back above all else. Humanity is always looking to give their family the absolute best. Immigrants are no different. My family is no different. 
Somos mujeres. Somos inmigrantes.
#official

We are a Family of Women 

Alexis Ruiz — Acworth, GA 

My mother raised my two sisters and I on her own. After overstaying her student visa, she became undocumented and we all felt the repercussions. My mother’s job options were very limited, but our struggles forged our bond and helped us become stronger, more independent women.

Today, we continue communicating each other’s joys, sorrows, and laughter. I am grateful for the sacrifice mom made to offer my sister’s and me the world. There’s a lot of misinformation out there that hides the reality that people come to the US to work hard and give back above all else. Humanity is always looking to give their family the absolute best. Immigrants are no different. My family is no different.

Somos mujeres. Somos inmigrantes.

#official

Tell us. Show us. What does family mean to you?
Help us build a national family album to put "family" first in the discussion on immigration reform.

view archive



About

What is CIR?

Media

Contact

Take Action

Submit Your Photo!